Habs vs. Red Army - 1975 HNIC

Discussion in 'Hockey Talk' started by Bronko, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. Bronko

    Bronko Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,713
    Likes Received:
    136
    Just watching CBC's replay of the new year's eve 1975 game between Red Army and the Habs.

    Habs severely outshot the Russkies but the Russkies played smart, Tretiak outplayed Ken Dryden and the thing ended in a 3-3 draw.


    Couple things I noted that the Russian coaches must have pre-determined. Habs had some great defensmen but Don Awrey, Pierre Bouchard and the like wren't two of them. Awrey was ravaged for the tying russian goal in the third.

    Russians also knew that guys like Gainey didn't represent a threat in open ice - Gainey was a great checker but really didn't have much of a shot, he was a short ice jam in the puck artist.

    Impressed by Russian basic skills. So different than some of the regular slobs and slugs we see in the regular NHL. Russians were really strong on their skates when driving to the net, not so much in open ice or in the corners.

    Initially, the russians started taking over the canadian game in the early 1950s, by around 1959 or 60 they were totally over-powering our hapless (but game) amateurs with their tic tac toe passing game and precision shooting.

    Tonite, Val Kharlamov ravaged Dryden with a sweep-in shot that only Sid Crosby could have pulled off in today's modern NHL.

    A healthy Kharlamov would have been a consistent NHL all-star and a 50 to 62 goal scorer in the NHL. Mihihlov was the russian version of Jean Beliveau (who sadly retired before this 1975 classic game)

    In the end I was most impressed by who even-tempered Dryden remained after the russians had poked 3 goals by him. Also liked Savard and Lemaire but who wouldn't...

    Kharlamov, Gusev, Michalov, Tretiak all were amazing for the red boys.

    Today's hackey doesn't even come close! Maybe Olympics, the odd NHL playoff game. Too many butchers & wackers in the NHL.

    NHL should be a world league.

    12 to 16 teams from North America.

    4 to 6 teams from Western Europe (Germany, Sweden, Norway, England) and
    4 teams from Russia

    Now that would be somethin''''
     
    Tags:
  2. iso_55

    iso_55 Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    4,668
    Likes Received:
    11
    We had a world league. The World Hockey Association. ;)
     
  3. iso_55

    iso_55 Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    4,668
    Likes Received:
    11
    I remember that game so well. I stayed home to watch it then when out for my New Year's Eve revelling afterwards getting home at 7 am the morning as I recall. One of the best hockey games I have ever seen. BTW, I have always loved house parties on NYE to going to some hall somewhere. Not as much fun. You know what made that game, Nate? It wasn't the actual hockey which was absolutely great. It was Danny Gallivan weaving his verbal magic doing play by play like nobody else can with his "cannonading shot", his "scintillating save" & "Savard Spinorama". I miss the man so much. RIP Danny.
     
  4. Bronko

    Bronko Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,713
    Likes Received:
    136
    Gallivan was in a world all his own Al. His play by play was scintillating. To me he was the quintessential voice of hockey for over a 1/4 century. Little Dicky Irvin added solid insight to the game. Obviously, CBC didn't have much in the way of between period shows like they (and TSN) do now but I liked the interview with Eagleson, loved the stuff with Kharmalov and absolutely loved Peter Mahovlich apologizing for the Canadians being unable to fetch a W for their fans - and Howie Meeker and the other blazer telling him he had nothing to be sorry about, his team had delivered one of the greatest hockey games ever witnessed. And Peter being touched by the announcers concern.
     
  5. iso_55

    iso_55 Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    4,668
    Likes Received:
    11
    There was Howie Meeker before the game still with the arrogant Canadian mentality that "we are the best" back then... 1972 never taught us anything... Meeker telling everyone that the Russians had no goalie as good as Dryden, no defensemen like Savard or Lapointe & no forwards like Mahovlich & Lafleur. He told the audience to sit back & enjoy the game because we had nothing to worry about...
     
  6. Bronko

    Bronko Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,713
    Likes Received:
    136
    Howie goofed bad about the Soviets - like most canadian players, coaches, fans, etc. Red Army field four pretty even and consistent lines, solid defense (nothing close to Lapointe, Savard, Robinson) and very good goaltending (Dryden was very good, Tretiak was better)

    The key for the soviet coaches was that the average 22 man NHL team always fielded some weaker players. Though the Habs were the best team in the NHL they couldn't hide Pierre Bouchard & Don Awry for the entire match and the russians capitalized on this. Also, Doug Risebrough was really young and green and probably too nervous to deliver excellence.

    The Red Army only played four games against 4 different NHL teams. The NHL didn't have film on them. Red Army had tons of film on their four opponents and saw how easy it was to expose flat-footed guys like Awry & Bouchard.
     
  7. iso_55

    iso_55 Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    4,668
    Likes Received:
    11
    Dryden played superb. He usually didn't as he had nightmares facing them when he was on Canada's National team in 1968 & 69 as well as Team canada in 1972. I wonder whatever happened to Roger Bourbonnais & Fran Huck??
     
  8. Bronko

    Bronko Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,713
    Likes Received:
    136
    Roger Bourbonais and Francis Huck were heroes to me. Under-sized and over-matched these men, and many like them (Herb & Gerry Pinder, Ross Parke, Ken Stephenson, etc.) formed the nucleus of Canada's national hockey program (amateur). They fought valiantly in many a world match against superior foes (Czechs, Russians, Swedes) and while the results weren't there, they all deserve Orders of Canada for the valiant stands they put forth, mostly on foreign soil.
     
  9. deuvl

    deuvl Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    6,848
    Likes Received:
    207
    I was at the subway challenge quebec junior elite vs. russians tonight and we got it handed to us 6-2.

    da sveedanya canada.
     

Share This Page

Loading...